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Why can’t you get a 2022 Toyota Tundra TRD off-road package with power running boards?

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Combining off-road equipment and the convenience of the power running boards and powered bed step seem like a home run for the 2022 Toyota Tundra TRD off-road truck — except you can’t do it.

The new 2022 Toyota Tundra is out now and many consumers are finding their wish lists get disrupted by either the limitations of the build-and-price tool or the allocation process causing frustrations on getting the exact specs on the truck you want.

In this case, the build-and-price tool is causing some frustration and with no apparent explanation until now.

This question came to me via email from a fan of the channel.

Jason writes:

Looking at buying a Tundra next year IF they fix some of there misses. However looking at the Tundra Builder option packages etc. it seems you can not add the power step package which includes power running boards and power step on the 1794+ and the TRD Package.

There is rumblings that it’s not an option due to the exhaust setup on the TRD package, just curious if you ask your buddy over at Toyota. 

Once again this is just another example of the lack of a follow through from Toyota IF that is the real reason.

Keep the good content coming! 

Thanks,
Jason

Why no 2022 Toyota Tundra TRD off-road with power running boards?

Naturally, I looked into it.

The Toyota build-and-price tool does indeed does what he describes when you try to select either the Power Running Boards with options package or the TRD Off-Road Package with options. It doesn’t let you select both.

2022 Toyota Tundra TRD off-road

Why not?

I reached out and got an answer from Nathan Kokes, Toyota Product Communications Senior Manager.

“Toyota restricted the combination of off-road package and power running boards to prevent the possibility of damage to these moving parts,” Kokes replied via email. “What he is seeing is accurate.”

In other words they envision TRD customers beating up their trucks when off-road, and Toyota doesn’t want the powered parts to get abused and then have to warranty them.

The bottom line

This is a smart move by Toyota to CYA, yet a frustrating thing for consumers who want to combine the best of both worlds. Looks like the aftermarket is Jason’s best bet in trying to find a solution.

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Tim Esterdahl

Automotive Journalist Tim Esterdahl has been a lover of trucks and SUVs for years. He has covered the industry since 2011 and has pieces in many national magazines and newspapers. In his spare time, he is often found tinkering on his '62 C10 pickup, playing golf, going hunting and hanging out with his wife and kids in Nebraska.

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