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What’s new for the 2022 Nissan Titan? Price increases up to $2,580

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Apparently if you want power in a pickup truck, you have to pay up. That’s the message Nissan is sending with a down-the-line price increase for the 2022 Nissan Titan.

Price increases range from $100 to $2,580, depending on the trim, and (spoiler alert) the lowest trim levels get the biggest price increases. But, as Nissan likes to brag, the Titan offers the most standard horsepower of any truck in its class. For 2022, the Titan will continue to use the 5.6-liter Endurance V-8 gasoline engine as the only powertrain option. Mated with a 9-speed transmission, it cranks out 400 horsepower and 413 pound-feet of torque.

Before we get into the pricing, let’s look at the few changes for the 2022 model year.

What’s new for the 2022 Nissan Titan?

The short answer to this question is very little. The Titan is mostly unchanged from last year. The SL trim is discontinued, with the Nissan Titan having four trims: S, SV, Platinum and Pro-4X. There are two cab sizes including King Cab and Crew Cab. The $2,440 Convenience Package is now standard on the SV King Cab. This package includes such niceties as a 9-inch touchscreen, remote start, dual-zone AC and eight-way adjustable front seats.

The Pro-4X trim also is no longer offered as a King Cab. Only the S trim has the King Cab configuration.

Pricing for 2022 Nissan Titan

As a truck that trails all of the segment leaders in sold units (by a wide margin), Nissan needs to remain competitive and relevant, so a price increase may not help that cause. The 2022 Titan is more expensive in some of its trims than its Detroit Three competitors (Ford, Ram and Chevy).

Here’s the pricing breakdown for this model year:

  • Titan S King Cab 4×2: $39,705 ($1,060 increase from last year)
  • Titan SV King Cab 4×2: $45,035 ($2,550 increase from last year)
  • Titan S King Cab S 4×4: $42,965 ($1,090 increase from last year)
  • Titan SV King Cab 4×4: $48,295 ($2,580 increase from last year)
  • Titan S Crew Cab 4×2: $41,475 ($100 increase from last year)
  • Titan SV Crew Cab 4×2: $44,955 ($130 increase from last year)
  • Titan Platinum Reserve Crew Cab 4×2: $58,395 ($260 increase from last year)
  • Titan S Crew Cab 4×4: $44,635 ($130 increase from last year)
  • Titan SV Crew Cab 4×4: $48,115 ($160 increase from last year)
  • Titan PRO-4X Crew Cab 4×4: $52,595 ($210 increase from last year)
  • Titan Platinum Reserve Crew Cab 4×4: $61,675 ($300 increase from last year)
  • Titan XD S Crew Cab 4×4: $47,275 ($150 increase from last year)
  • Titan XD SV Crew Cab 4×4: $41,055 ($190 increase from last year)
  • Titan XD PRO-4X Crew Cab 4×4: $56,865 ($250 increase from last year)
  • Titan XD Platinum Reserve Crew Cab 4×4: $64,735 ($330 increase from last year)

The bottom line on 2022 Nissan Titan

The Titan was already on shaky legs in the full-size pickup truck segment. It only sold 27,406 units last year, which places it a distant fifth. Increased pricing is probably not the best way for Nissan to drive sales and interest to the Titan. Will this decision come back to bite them in the butt? Could this lead to this being the last generation for the Titan? The automaker is already discontinuing the Titan in Canada. V-8 engine or not, they need more to offer the consumer here in the U.S.

What is your take on the Nissan Titan? If you bought one, what was your reasoning and consideration? Leave us your comment below.

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Jimmy Dinsmore

Jimmy is News Editor for PickupTruckTalk with an expertise in new vehicles. He is also a Ford Mustang historian having authored the book Mustang by Design (available on Amazon). His second book, about the history of Ford's F-Series truck comes out next year.

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1 Comment

  1. Paul February 7, 2022

    I bought a 2021 Titan instead of a 2022 Tundra due to the naturally aspirated V8 offered on the Titan versus the twin turbo V6 on the Tundra. Nissan also has the best warranty in the 1/2 ton segment with 5 years/100,000 miles powertrain coverage.

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