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What are the most common kinds of truck crash?

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Commercial trucks play a vital role in keeping the global economic wheels turning. But with more trucks than ever on the road, it’s not surprising to discover that the number of truck crash occurrences is also increasing. Although trucks are built to haul the goods that we depend upon, they also constitute a risk to smaller vehicles around them.

Truck crashes can happen for a multitude of reasons. From trucks being overloaded, or left in disrepair, to distracted or drowsy drivers, it doesn’t take much to cause a collision.

If you or a loved one have been affected by a truck crash, talking to a personal injury lawyer from an Augusta law firm can help a ton. A quick consultation will give you an idea as to the validity of your case, and how much you might recover for your injuries and losses should you decide to file a claim.

Read on to find out more about the most common types of truck accidents on the roads today, many of which cause more devastation than any other form of car crash. When it comes to automotive collisions, size truly does matter.

Jackknife

A jackknife happens when the rig folds itself to form a 90-degree angle with the trailer. These incidents tend to occur when the driver brakes quickly and hard, bringing the weight of the trailer forward against the traction of the cab. As the truck loses its equilibrium and folds, smaller vehicles around it may be impacted.

Rollovers

A truck may roll over when the driver loses control of the rig. It then slides onto its side, rolling over and potentially flattening motorists around it. There are many reasons why a driver may lose control of their truck, but the most common is speeding.

Tire blowout

Any kind of vehicle can experience a tire blowout. When this happens, the driver may feel as though they are losing control of the vehicle, which is moving wildly in wayward directions. However, when the vehicle that suffered the blowout is a truck, and it starts swerving out of control, vehicles around it may be hit.

Blind spots

All motor vehicles with B and C-pillars have blind spots. Therefore, the size of blind spots in a commercial, C-Class truck is much greater. When a truck driver is unable to see the cars around it while changing lanes, they may be crushed, forced off the road, or pushed into oncoming traffic.

Rear end

Due to the heavy weight of a big rig, rear-end collisions can cause property damage, severe injuries, or even the loss of life. That’s why driving near a big truck should always be done so while expecting the unexpected.

Head on collision

A head-on collision with a truck can be devastating. It’s not uncommon for these kinds of crashes to cause serious injuries or even death. Head-on collisions are among some of the deadliest car crashes. So when a large truck is involved, the danger rises even further.

Lost load

Improperly loaded cargo or cargo that is not sufficiently secured, or just too heavy for the size/type of truck being utilized can cause significant danger to any car around it. A lost load often happens when a trucking company tries to transport as much merchandise as possible from one point to another in the shortest amount of time. The result can be disastrous.

T-bone truck crash

These collisions occur when a truck driver runs a red light or does not stop at a stop sign and hits another vehicle perpendicularly. When a smaller car is hit on the side, the driver may be seriously maimed or killed, especially if the impact is on the driver’s side. Passengers are subject to the same risks when the T-bone collision happens on the other side of the vehicle.

Final thoughts on truck crash figures

Since the pandemic began, it seems as though truck crashes have been on the rise. This may be due in part to disruptions in the global supply chain, which has placed tremendous pressure on trucking companies. A loss in the labor force, with consumers opting for online shopping over in-store buying has only fueled these statistics. Unfortunately, it is often the consumer that pays the ultimate price when a truck collision occurs.

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