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Tundra hybrid vs. F-150 PowerBoost: A look at pricing, power and payload

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Since Toyota just released full specs for the 2022 Tundra hybrid today, we can finally do a comparison of the only two hybrid full-size trucks on the market. But rather than drag out a complete spec-by-spec list, we pulled out the most salient info – namely pricing, power, MPGs and towing. (Chart below)

From this brief look, it’s clear Toyota and Ford had completely different strategies when developing their hybrids.

Pricing

The Ford strategy seems to be one of making the hybrid more accessible. So, you can get the F-150 PowerBoost starting on the base XL trim, but it’s not available on the top two rugged trims. At the base XL trim this is a $4,495 premium over the non-hybrid truck.

Toyota, however, makes it more of an exclusive feature, only making it available on the top trims. Furthermore, the high-lux Capstone trim and off-road-ready TRD Pro trim are hybrid-only vehicles. So, to get into a hybrid Tundra, you’ll spend a minimum of $16,350 over the base price to level up to the Limited trim with the hybrid. If you were simply looking Limited to Limited, that’s a $3,400 add for the i-Force Max engine.

We’re not sure who comes out the winner here. While the Ford F-150 hybrid is more affordable, Toyota is banking on the fact this engine will be a luxury item customers are willing to pay for.

Power

Toyota has made no bones about the fact it focused on power for towing with its Tundra hybrid engine. So, you get an additional 13 pound-feet of torque that smooths out some of the edges in terms of performance. In our first-drive video, we spent some time talking about how this made a huge difference in the peppiness of the Tundra while towing first 3,400-pounds, then 5,800 pounds.

The trade off, however, is going to be fuel economy. While several people thought this would be a 30-MPG truck, it isn’t – by a long shot. In fact, it gets worse fuel economy than the the F-150 PowerBoost by about 2-3 MPG in combined driving.

It certainly does better than the outgoing V-8 and the current V-6, but we’ll be curious to see if the power increase wins out over the fuel economy numbers when talking about hybrid powertrains.

Payload

With the extra power and increased focus on towing, payload and towing numbers for the Tundra hybrid are a bit of a stumper. While the hybrid’s numbers are slightly better than the Tundra V-6 numbers, they’re significantly less than the Ford F-150 PowerBoost numbers.

Depending on what you tow, that could be a dealbreaker for some folks.

 Ford F-150 PowerBoostToyota Tundra HybridToyota Tundra V-6 CrewMax
Base price (including destination)$43,890 (XL) $53,995 (Limited)$37,645 (SR)
Top price$78,930 (Limited)$75,225 (Capstone)$62,715 (1794)
Trim availabilityXL, XLT, Lariat, King Ranch, Platinum, LimitedLimited, Platinum, 1794, Capstone, TRD ProSR, SR5, Limited, Platinum, 1974
Engine3.5L V-6 twin-turbochargers3.5L V-6 Hybrid, twin-turbochargers3.5L V-6, twin turbochargers
Horespower430 @ 6,000 RPM437 @ 5,200 RPM389 @ 5,200 RPM
Torque570 lb-ft 3,000 RPM583 lb-ft 2,400 RPM479 lb-ft @ 2,400 RPM
Fuel economy city/hwy/combined (4X2)25/25/25 MPG20/24/22 MPG18/24/20 MPG (SR); 18/23/20 (SR5, Limited, Platinum, 1794)
Fuel economy city/hwy/combined (4X4)23/23/23 MPG19/22/21 MPG (Limited, Platinum, 1794, Capstone); 19/21/20 (TRD Pro)17/23/19 MPG (SR, SR5); 17/22/19 (Limited, Platinum, 1794)
Max towing (4X2)12,700 lb11,450 lb11,400 lb
Max towing (4X4)12,400 lb11,175 lb11,160 lb
Max payload (4X2)2,120 lb1,680 lb1,830 lb
Max payload (4X4)1,830 lb1,665 lb1,820 lb

The bottom line on the Tundra hybrid pricing, power & payload

This is an interesting line Toyota drew in the sand here. More power with a smoother torque curve, but less efficiency, less payload and a higher price.

I will say I did like the ride and handling of the Tundra hybrid better than the F-150 PowerBoost – not to mention the towing experience was certainly smoother. But will that be enough to keep Toyota fans loyal?

We’ll be curious to see how this works out for them. What are your thoughts? Is the higher price of the Tundra hybrid worth it?

Want more info on the 2022 Toyota Tundra hybrid, be sure to check out our first drive review.

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Jill Ciminillo

Jill Ciminillo is the Managing Editor for Pickup Truck + SUV Talk as well as a Chicago-based automotive writer, YouTube personality and podcast host, with her articles and videos appearing in outlets throughout the U.S. Additionally, she co-hosts a weekly radio show on car stuff for a local Chicago station. Previously, Jill has been the automotive editor for both newspaper and broadcast media conglomerates. She is also a past president for the Midwest Automotive Media Association and has the distinction of being the first female president for that organization. Jill is also currently a juror for the North American Car, Utility and Truck of the Year (NACTOY).

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3 Comments

  1. Ted February 1, 2022

    Owner of (2) Toyota vehicles here and I can’t say enough about the quality & value I’ve experienced with them. However I’ve ordered a new F-150 PowerBoost (with much credit to Tim’s videos) instead of the new Tundra because 1) I don’t like the new styling. 2) The color choices are lacking. 3) No Power Pro package like Ford. 4) The hybrid battery takes up space under the rear seat. 5) I can order a Ford in a wide range of combinations that Toyota doesn’t offer. I will miss the reliability of my Toyota with 302,000 miles and perhaps I may regret that decision in the long term. Toyota needed to go above and beyond with this redesign, when in reality they’re just playing catch up.

    Reply
    1. Jill Ciminillo February 2, 2022

      Yeah. I think we were all a little disappointed with with Toyota didn’t do on the new 2022 Tundra. You’ll have to let us know how it goes with your PowerBoost!

      Reply
  2. Gerald Foley June 5, 2022

    I put a deposit down on a 1794 in October and am still waiting. And after the wait and seeing the long list of build quality issues, I am strongly considering moving toward an F150 hybrid. Numbers look better (MGG and $$) in comparison even if Toyota are a known for a little bit better quality product; generally speaking at least

    Reply

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